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    National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has came out firmly in favour of the rights of imaginary children,

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    superarmy
    Nymph
    Nymph

    National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has came out firmly in favour of the rights of imaginary children,

    Post  superarmy on Tue Mar 31, 2009 5:11 am

    The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) has joined such luminaries as UNICEF in coming out firmly in favour of the rights of imaginary children, lending its full support to the UK’s new draft legislation, set to ensure any illustrations of humans under the age of 18 a court deems erotic are rendered highly illegal, with anime and manga and their ambiguously aged characters likely to fair badly under the law.

    The NSPCC’s Zoe Hilton has this to say on the subject:

    “The NSPCC supports making non-photographic pictures of child sexual abuse illegal. We know from working with police forces across the UK that these types of pictures are more frequently appearing in the possession of people who are arrested for, or charged with, offences relating to child abuse images.

    Our contacts with the police lead us to believe that non-photographic pictures of child sexual abuse, such as drawings, cartoons, or computer generated images, are an established part of the wider pool of child abuse images in circulation.

    The fact that many of these images are currently legal implies a degree of acceptance or tolerance of depictions of child sexual abuse, and we want the law to send out a clear message that such depictions are unacceptable.

    In practical terms we have found that the current legal status of these images means that they cannot be physically removed from offenders or confiscated by the police. It also reduces the effectiveness of therapeutic work which challenges perpetrators’ beliefs that child sexual abuse is acceptable.

    Practitioners tell us that offenders use non-photographic images of abuse to rationalise and legitimise their own abusive thoughts and feelings toward children.

    It is also important to point out that The Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, which amends the Protection of Children Act 1978 (Part 7, section 84), already covers pseudo-photographs.

    In the UK it has never been necessary to prove that an actual child has been abused for an image to be considered illegal. The reasoning for this was based in part on the wider, damaging impact that such images could have on society. This is the approach that we continue to support.

    Some of the recent media debate surrounding the new reforms has suggested that the materials to be made illegal will cover artistic works, or be mainstream in nature. NSPCC does not believe this to be the case.

    As we understand it, the proposed thresholds mean that these materials are not something that anyone is ever likely to make or view unintentionally, unless they stumble across them by accident on the internet.

    Let’s be clear that what we are talking about here are non-photographic images depicting serious sexual abuse and violence against children. And with that in mind we would urge the UK government to make such images illegal.”

    The NSPCC was initially founded in 1884 to lobby for “pro-child” legislation; in more recent years the organisation has faced extensive criticism for spending huge sums on advertising campaigns of questionable merit, and for cultivating wherever possible an atmosphere of moral panic.

    With regards to their failure to actually help any children in recent decades, they admit that “lobbying is more effective than direct action [to help children].”

    The NSPCC has some particularly relevant experience in imaginary child abuse; it was heavily implicated in the “Satanic ritual abuse” scandals of the 1980s and 1990s, where social workers and psychologists fabricated thousands of cases of “Satanic” abuse cases using hypnosis and leading questioning, with the UK perpetrators of this mass-deception often being NSPCC staff, or informed by their publications.

    Rolling Eyes

    My response, FUCK YOU. Don't you have better things to do than moderate artistic freedom?
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    Anjewel
    Giant
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    Re: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has came out firmly in favour of the rights of imaginary children,

    Post  Anjewel on Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:47 am

    It just gets worse and worse this world we habitat... Rolling Eyes
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    superarmy
    Nymph
    Nymph

    Re: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has came out firmly in favour of the rights of imaginary children,

    Post  superarmy on Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:51 am

    The problem I have with it is, yes it will get the obvious stuff first, indeed I won't complain. But the line will get further up.

    Scenarios like
    Artists"It is a scene depicting love between two teens for the first time"
    Censor"How old are they?"
    Artist"Both 18"
    Censor"They don't look 18, I'm afraid I will have to prosecute you"

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    Re: National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children has came out firmly in favour of the rights of imaginary children,

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